Tag Archives: IL-1

Anti-CD3 Control of T Cells and Milk for Immune Development

Mansion Becomes Maternity Home- Life at Brocket Hall, Welwyn, Hertfordshire, 1942 D9026
Breast milk sugars are crucial for regulating the intestinal immune responses in newborns.
This week on TIBDI! Gene expression signatures of anti-TNFα non-responders are investigated, breast milk oligosaccharides regulate developing immune responses, and an anti-CD3 antibody offers hope for T cell regulation in the gut.

Inflammatory Signatures of Anti-TNFα Non-Responders

Even though anti-TNFα therapy for Crohn’s disease (CD) patients is very effective, up to 40% of patients are or become non-responders. To find out if there were differences in gene expression between these groups of patients, Dr. Raquel Franco Leal of the Hospital Clinic in Barcelona Spain examined mRNA levels of inflammatory genes in these two populations. She found that treatment with anti-TNFα effectively regulated many cytokines and chemokine genes despite the clinical outcome. However, those that achieved a clinical remission also had a number of changes in many other genes including IL1B, S100A8 and CXCL1. In contrast, refractory patients continued to have deregulated genes associated with pathways inducing IL17A. Besides introducing new drugs targets, these results reemphasize the importance of IL-17 pathways in CD.

Developing Immune Systems Need Milk

The complex immunoregulatory mechanisms needed to protect and control the human gut are developed early after birth, and are catalyzed by the colonization of the intestinal tract with bacteria. Suspecting that breast milk may protect the early intestinal tract from unwanted inflammatory responses, Dr. Y. He and colleagues investigated human milk oligosaccharides from colostrum (cHMOSs). Using human fetal intestine explants, they were able to determine that cHMOSs significantly altered immune gene expression. Their model suggests that cHMOSs attenuate pathogen-associated receptor signaling, simultaneously lowering immune cell activation and enhancing pathways needed for clearance, regulation and tissue repair.

Anti-Inflammatory Anti-CD3

T cells likely play an important role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by maintaining inflammatory responses. Finding a way to specifically reduce or deactivate these cells in IBD patients could be a possible therapy. Dr. Anna Vossenkämper, together her colleagues, experimented with this idea using a special anti-CD3 antibody called otelixizumab, which is known to induce tolerance. Using mucosal biopsies from IBD patients, she was able to determine that otelixizumab could decrease pro-inflammatory cytokine production and lower the activity of multiple immune pathways. The antibody’s effects were determined to be dependent on IL-10 expression.

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Lost Faecalibacteria in IBD and IL-10 Influences Inflammasomes

Lab mouse
Mice deficient in IL-10 have over active inflammasomes, which cause colitis.
This week on TIBDI: A new review is published on the gut microbiome, IBD patients have less butyrate-producing bacteria, and IL-10 deficient mice are inflamed by inflammasomes.

Healthy Gut Microbiome in the Spotlight

The state of the intestinal microbiome, in essence the microbiota genome, is proving to be an important factor during disease development and progression. However before in depth studies are done to define disease-related microbiome profiles, it’s essential to also have an idea of what profiles define a healthy state. Dr. Emily B. Hollister of the Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital reviewed the current literature. In general, the gut microbiome has approximately more than 10 million non-redundant genes, and a more diverse microbiome is healthier than less diverse one. Not everyone has the same types of populations of bacteria; most healthy microbiomes can be classified into three basic enterotypes. The influence of the microbiome extends to the immune system, cellular nutrition, cellular protection, metabolic processes and the functioning of the nervous system.

Lost Faecalibacteria in IBD

Many researchers are searching for the right probiotics to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To support this kind of search, simultaneous research investigating the microbiota in IBD patients as compared to healthy ones is also necessary. Wei Wang of Wuhan University recently published evidence that some major changes in the IBD microbiota are an increase in Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli along with a loss of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. The loss of F. prausnitzii was especially considerable in patients with active Crohn’s disease (CD). F. prausnitzii is known to produce butyrate, which is especially important for the formation of regulatory T cells in the colon. The author suggests that instead of focusing on common lactic acid producing probiotics in IBD, patients may be better served by looking at butyrate-producing probiotic species.

IL-10 Deficient Mice Inflamed by Inflammasomes

An interesting model of IBD is the interleukin (IL)-10 deficient mouse, which develops spontaneous colitis. Dr. J. Zhang of the Medical University of South Carolina found evidence that inflammasomes play a role in this model by promoting chronic intestinal inflammation. He found that loss of IL-10 increased the levels of NLRP3 and contributed to more inflammasome activity. This caused higher amounts of active IL-1β to be produced in gut tissues, which also led to increased colitogenic Th17. Blocking inflammsome activation successfully improved the colitis of the IL-10 deficient mice, suggesting that similar strategies could be useful in IBD.

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NLRP3 Beats Bacteria and Anti-TNFα Needs No Help

Citrobacter freundii Gram stain
NLRP3 helps prevent intestinal colonisation of Citrobacter bacteria.
This week on TIBDI: we learn why NLRP3 polymorphisms are interesting for Crohn’s disease, and the combination treatment of anti-TNFα and methotrexate isn’t better than anti-TNFα alone.

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